Talk by Jarko Paavola, White Space Trials in Finland

The summer sees two students from Turku in Finland spending time at CTVR working on a PMSE database for the White Spaces Initiative. Their supervisor Jarko Paavola will give a talk on the PMSE database developed in Finland and the white spaces trials there.

  • Location: CTVR Trinity College Dublin, Dunlop Oriel House, Fenian Street, Dublin
  • Date: 24th May 2013
  • Time: 12:00pm

The Life of our Mobile Phones

andrew25 April 2013: As part of the lecture series ‘Trinity and its Neighbours’, Centre Director Linda Doyle spoke  about The Invisible Landscape of the City – the secret life of our mobile phones. The lecture, arranged by Trinity College and St Andrew’s Resource Centre (both in Dublin), was an opportunity for Linda to present CTVR’s work and new developments in the use of radio waves in a unique setting – St Andrew’s Parish Church – to an audience of non-engineers but expert mobile phone users.

Simon Saunders – Small Cells and Much More

Simon Saunders, founding President of the Small Cell Forum, Adjunct Professor at Trinity/CTVR will give a talk on various aspects of his Real Wireless work in CTVR .

  • Location: CTVR Trinity College Dublin, Dunlop Oriel House, Fenian Street, Dublin
  • Date: 14th May 2013
  • Time: 12:00pm

International Ph.D. Course: “Cognitive Radios and Networks: Theory and Practice”

CTVR in cooperation with Aalborg University hosted an international course for Telecomms PhD students on 13 May 2013 in Dublin.
Demand for mobile services is increasing fast, and current wireless network technologies will soon be bottlenecks to the growth of both services and market. Furthermore, the apparent spectrum scarcity does not provide enough space for future wireless communications systems. Cognitive Radio (CR) has developed as a possible solution for coping with such problems, giving the possibility of efficiently using/re-using the spectrum resources in an autonomous and opportunistic way. This topic is much current interest by academia and industry, as demonstrated by ongoing activities in standardization bodies such as ETSI and IEEE.
This course provided an overview of the possibilities but also the issues that such a powerful concept offers, ranging from theoretical and algorithmic design to practical implementation on research-oriented software-defined radio platforms like Iris and ASGARD.
Instructors : Luiz DaSilva, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, and Virginia Tech, USA; Linda Doyle, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland; Nicola Marchetti, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland; Andrea F. Cattoni, Aalborg University, Denmark; Petar Popovski, Aalborg University, Denmark; Hamed Ahmadi, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
International Ph.D. Course Sponsored by the Telecommunications Graduate Initiative (TGI), which is funded by the Higher Education Authority under the Programme for Research in Third-Level Institutions and co-funded under the European Regional Development Fund.
Program: available here.
Lecture notes:
Overview of cognitive radio concept and applications [Andrea F. Cattoni]
Techniques for determining spectrum availability [Nicola Marchetti]
Dynamic spectrum access: regulatory aspects [Linda Doyle]
Information theoretic aspects of cognitive radio (part 1) [Petar Popovski]

Talk by Phillipa Marks: Policy approaches for meeting growing spectrum demand – the role of shared spectrum access

The focus will be on Europe.  Phillipa will present some results from the EU pilot spectrum inventory study (which Plum did with WIK for the European Commission) showing spectrum availability, comment on the nature of access being sought by different users, and then discuss possible sharing models with a focus on Licensed Shared Access.

  • Location: CTVR Trinity College Dublin, Dunlop Oriel House, Fenian Street, Dublin
  • Date: 10th May 2013
  • Time: 3:00pm

Licensed shared access (LSA) can be defined as the sharing of licensed spectrum assignments under pre-defined technical conditions, enabling the provider of secondary level sharer to guarantee the quality of the service to be provided.  The primary level spectrum rights holder (incumbent) would facilitate shared use of its spectrum assignment with other users under specified conditions.

ABOUT PHILLIPA MARKS

Phillipa Marks has particular expertise in the economics of spectrum policy and management. She advised the New Zealand government on creating the first ever national market in spectrum in 1989. Since then she has advised on spectrum policy issues in Europe, Asia-Pacific, Middle East and North America. She developed the approach to spectrum pricing (AIP) now applied in the UK and works on spectrum valuation, licensing and allocation issues. She also works on the analysis of economic, public policy and regulatory issues in the media and telecommunications industries. She has first class honours degrees in mathematics and economics from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand and an M.Litt from Oxford University. Phillipa is a member of the Ofcom Spectrum Advisory Board (OSAB).

COST Action Management Committee Meeting 11-12 March 2013

COSTActionLocation: CTVR Trinity College Dubln, Dunlop Oriel House, Fenian Street, Dublin
Date: 11 March 2013
Time: 8.30am

The 8th COST Action IC0902 management committee meeting will be held in the vibrant city of Dublin, Ireland, on 11-12 March 2013. The main objective of COST Action IC0902 is to integrate the cognitive concept across all layers of communication systems, resulting in the definition of a European platform for cognitive radio and networks.

In conjunction with the meeting, we will host a mini workshop on Learning and Artificial Intelligence for Cognitive Radio and Networking, which are the topics of interest of the COST Action IC0902 Special Interest Group 2. Contributions presenting early results and work-in-progress on all topics relevant to the IC0902 SIG 2 are welcome and submissions by young researchers are strongly encouraged.

Workshop program:

Program at a glance:

Time Table 11 March 12 March
8:30 – 9:00 Registration
9:00-10:45 MC meeting MC meeting
10:45-11:00 Tea break Tea break
11:00-12:45 MC meeting Technical Session 3
12:45-14:00 Lunch break Lunch
14:00-15:45 Technical Session 1
15:45-16:00 Tea break
16:00-17:45 Technical Session 2

Seminar presented by Professor Allen MacKenzie, E.T.S. Walton Visiting Professor

  • Location: CTVR Seminar Room
  • Date: 26 October 2012
  • Time: 13.00-14.00
Abstract
The history of wireless communications can be told through the history of resource management. In this talk, Professor MacKenzie will describe the ongoing evolution from static to dynamic resource management and the concurrent evolution from homogeneous to heterogeneous networks. From this description, Professor MacKenzie will draw two themes for the future: (1) a need for a pragmatic, bootstrapped approach to dynamic resource assignment, and (2) a demand for robust approaches to automated negotiation between radio agents.
Along the first theme, Professor MacKenzie will show how unbounded dynamicism leads to failure; instead, we need pragmatically engineered systems that can bootstrap wireless communications from simple beginnings to complex sharing schemes. In particular, he will describe a proposed channel assignment scheme for cognitive radio networks that balances the need for topology adaptation to maximize flow rate and the need for a stable baseline topology to support network connectivity. Professor MacKenzie will focus on networks in which nodes are equipped with multiple radios or transceivers, each of which can be assigned to a channel. First, we assign channels independently of traffic, to achieve basic network connectivity and support light loads such as control traffic, and, second, we dynamically assign channels to the remaining transceivers in response to traffic demand. We formulate the problem as a two-stage mixed integer linear program (MILP) and show that with this two-stage approach we can achieve performance comparable to a fully dynamic channel assignment scheme while preserving a static, connected topology.
In the second theme, Professor MacKenzie will then describe the necessity of automated negotiation in future systems, including the relationship between these negotiated dynamics and the bootstrapped approach discussed in the first theme. In particular, he will explain some of the tentative steps that we have taken in this direction, including applications of auction theory and coalition game theory. Finally, he will introduce some potential tools and approaches for future research (and promote some future tutorial presentations on these topics).
Biography
Allen B. MacKenzie received his bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering and Mathematics from Vanderbilt University in 1999. In 2003 he earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering at Cornell University and joined the faculty of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech, where he is now an associate professor. During the 2012-2013 academic year, he is an E.T.S. Walton Visiting Professor at CTVR: The Telecommunications Research Centre at Trinity College Dublin.
Prof. MacKenzie’s research focuses on wireless communications systems and networks. His research interests include cognitive radio and cognitive network algorithms, architectures, and protocols and the analysis of such systems and networks using game theory. His past and current research sponsors include the National Science Foundation, Science Foundation Ireland, the US Army, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the National Institute of Justice.
Prof. MacKenzie is an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Communications and the IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing. He also serves on the technical program committee of several international conferences in the areas of communications and networking, and is a regular reviewer for journals in these areas.Prof. MacKenzie is a senior member of the IEEE and a member of the ASEE and the ACM. He is the author of more than 50 refereed conference and journal papers and the co-author of the book Game Theory for Wireless Engineers.